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International Town & Gown Association 
College Town Newsletter
 
Sept. 8, 2016
 
Welcome to Dateline, a weekly newsletter
highlighting college town news around the world
In This Issue
Georgetown University and Neighbors Make Nice With 20-Year Campus Plan
UVM Students Work to Stop 'Brain Drain' With New Site
Chico Bike Path Cameras Go Live; Advocate Envisions Surveillance at City Parks, Plaza
City and University Officials Want Students to Feel at Home in Frostburg
Gorillas Make a Difference in the Lives of Crawford County Kids
Harvard Offers Lessons to Big City Mayors
Georgetown University and Neighbors Make Nice With 20-Year Campus Plan
Washington City Paper, by Andrew Giambrone
Georgetown University is making headlines for resolv-ing, among other measures, to give an admissions edge to perspective students who are descended from slaves who built the school. But also important to the school's future is the 20-year campus plan formally submitted to the city Thursday, which strives to balance the interests of Georgetown the university with those of Georgetown the neighborhood. Founded four years ago, the Georgetown Community Partnership was created to serve as a forum for school adminis-trators, students, local civic groups, and neighborhood commissioners who'd sometimes been at odds over the university's growth. Fast forward to today, the group is hailing the comprehensive plan as a result of "a dedicat-ed and collaborative process." Among the schools goals are to enroll addi-tional graduate students under the current cap and, in response to com-plaints, reduce the number of undergraduates living off-campus.  
UVM Students Work to Stop 'Brain Drain' With New Site
Burlington Free Press, by Cory Dawson
For two UVM students, bridging the gap between local businesses and college students is just another day at the office. Beacon was founded by Peter Silverman and Max Robbins, both UVM juniors in the business school. Their company's website is basically a job board, but to describe it that way would do the idea a disservice. The company, which launched its site BeaconVT.com Thursday, allows students to offer themselves up for work via an online profile. Business can also post their openings publicly and pay Beacon for access to an ever-growing pool of ready-to-work people, complete with resumes, skill areas and examples of what they have done for past Beacon clients. But on top of conventional internships and job postings, the com-pany encourages businesses to offer their short-term tasks or projects to students so they can gain experience and figure out what to do without the pressure of an internship that takes up the entire summer. 
Chico Bike Path Cameras Go Live; Advocate Envisions Surveillance at City Parks, Plaza
ChicoER Crime, by Andre Byik
A police surveillance system installed along a troubled path near Chico State University has officially gone live, and a driving force behind the project envisions security cameras watching over other public spaces. The Chico police surveillance system, also known as the Bike Path Safety Camera Project, is intended to improve safety for many students and other community members who use the path. In February, the Police Department said it had received about 193 calls for service there since January 2013. The calls included reports of such violent crimes as sexual assaults, stabbings and robberies. The camera system-which has received funding through individuals, businesses, organizations, foundations and Chico State, has the ability to stream live video and record video, as well. The system's most significant purpose, will be to serve as a deterrent, said Chico police Lt. Matt Madden.
City and University Officials Want Students to Feel at Home in Frostburg
Times-News.com, by Heather B. Wolford
College officials and city leaders are delivering a mes-sage to Frostburg State University students this school year-"you're part of this community." "If you're part of something," said City Administrator John Kirby, "you'll take care of it." Earlier this month, university officials hosted William Laramee, a community liaison officer from Amherst, Massachusetts. Home to three univer-sities, Amherst is dealing with many of the same student-related issues Frostburg faces. Laramee shared tips with Frostburg officials on how his tactics in Amherst work to lessen some of the negative impact students can have. A new initiative focused on welcoming students to the community is Frostburg 101: A Taste of the City. On Sept. 10, restaurants and retail stores on Main Street will offer discounts, giveaways and prizes for students as a way to invite them into the community. This gives students a chance to start caring about the town they inhabit nearly nine months out of the year.
Gorillas Make a Difference in the Lives of Crawford County Kids
Town-Gown Nation News
Pittsburg State University, by Staff Writers
Quietly, without fanfare and largely under the radar, the Challenger Program is changing the lives of Crawford County children and it wouldn't be happening without the hard work of scores of current and former Pittsburg State University students. Challenger is a community based psychosocial group treatment program of the Crawford County Mental Health Center (CCMHC) that serves seriously emotionally disturbed children. Summer Challenger ended Aug. 5, having served about 150 children ages 3-19 and employing about 75 PSU students. Mike Ehling, director of children's services for CCMHC, said Challenger was developed in 1993 and was influenced by a staff retreat with Scott Gorman, a professor in PSU's Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation, who led the staff in team-building exercises based on the Adventure Based Counseling model and from Newt Gingrich. 
Harvard Offers Lessons to Big City Mayors
BBC News, by Sean Coughlan
Running a city is a big job. It can mean responsibility for thousands of staff and services for millions of people. But what qualifications prepare you of taking those big decisions? An innovative project in the United States is trying to fill this knowledge gap, in what's being claimed as the biggest such civic training project in the world. They're setting up a school for mayors. The Bloomberg-Harvard Cities Leadership Initiative is a 32m training scheme for serving mayors and their senior aides, with the aim of equipping them for tough decisions. The funding has come from Bloomberg Philan-thropies, the charity set up by one of the most high-profile of US mayors, Michael Bloomberg, who served three terms as mayor of New York City. It will reach 300 mayors and 400 mayoral aides in the next four years, with the training delivered by Harvard Business School and Harvard Kennedy School. There will be no charge for the mayoral students.  
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